Calls for Proposals for new edited collection on memory in popular culture

Exciting news!

I am currently seeking proposals for an upcoming collection, Essays on Memory in Popular Culture, under contract with McFarland.

The key assumption of this collection is that, contrary to the conventional wisdom that memory is no longer important, this rhetorical canon has been transformed and complicated rather than subsumed, as recent scholarship into such areas as digital media, fandom studies, and memory objects demonstrates. This collection, therefore, seeks essays and participant reflections that document and examine this rhetorical principle in all its complexity.

Submissions are being solicited that examine cultural memory within the following categories:

  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Genre texts
  • Fandom activities (including fan fiction and cosplay)
  • Online Gaming
  • Digital collaboration and media

In addition to traditional academic essays (approximately 5,000 words each), there will also be a section for player and participant reflections (approximately 1,000 words) that briefly describe the experience of fan memory from a non-academic perspective.

I will be distributing these CFPs during Arisia this weekend (January 17-20, 2014) and you can also follow these links for more information:

Proposals should be submitted to memoryinsf_book @i cloud.com by May 1, 2014.

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4 comments on “Calls for Proposals for new edited collection on memory in popular culture

  1. Gene'O says:

    Reblogged this on The Writing Catalog and commented:
    This is very interesting, and I plan to take a look at these links. Reblogging it here to share with all my friends who are interested in such, and so I will not forget about it.

  2. […] history and memory involved in these communities. Such considerations led to my new project, the collection on memory in popular culture. While I want to capture the fannish sense of history and memory, I also know I need to do so in as […]

  3. […] to announce that I have signed another contract with McFarland for a companion collection to Essays on Memory in Popular Culture, this one focusing just on the way memory works in post-apocalyptic and dystopian stories. The […]

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