CFP: Panel on Resisting Language as Weapon (open until 9/30/17)

Calling #teamrhetoric!

With a little less than a month of “official” summer left, I wanted to let everyone know about a panel I’ll be running at the 49th NeMLA Annual Convention that will take place in Pittsburgh from April 12-15, 2018 at the Omni William Penn.

Resisting the Weaponization of Language: A Panel (https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17008)

As specialists in language studies, we have a particular affinity for and accompanying responsibility to use language in ethical ways. We embrace the power of language to change the world and ourselves for “good,” but are rightfully hesitant to focus on the potential for language to cause harm out of concerns regarding silencing and censorship. Yet, there can be no doubt that language can and does cause harm. Abstracts are encouraged that examine such weaponization of language from a variety of perspectives including, but not limited to, “grammar” as cudgel, misgendering and/or dead naming transgender individuals, and dehumanizing language in public discourse.

Follow the link above to submit a 300-word abstract before the September 30th deadline. Members and non-members of NeMLA may submit to as many sessions as they want, although they may present on only one paper presentation panel and only one other type of session (a roundtable or a creative session).

NEMLA_logo

Advertisements

CFP: Roundtable on Chronic Illness in Academia

Calling all spoonies, zebras, and other scholars with disabilities and/or chronic illnesses!

With a little less than a month of “official” summer left, I wanted to let everyone know about a roundtable I’ll be running at the 49th NeMLA Annual Convention that will take place in Pittsburgh from April 12-15, 2018 at the Omni William Penn.

Chronic Illness in Academia: A Roundtable (https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17006)

The academic space we inhabit–as scholars and as teachers–is very much a domain for the able-bodied. Yet, as more and more academics are acknowledging, invisible disabilities like chronic illness are more common than the academy seems to realize.

This roundtable invites proposals from a variety of perspectives and professional experiences navigating an academic space where the opportunities, guidelines, expectations and accommodations are based nearly entirely on imagined ideals of what it means to be “healthy.” Those who self-identify as chronically ill or otherwise disabled are especially invited to submit proposals, though such self-disclosure will not be required.

 
Follow the link above to submit a 300-word abstract before the September 30th deadline. Members and non-members of NeMLA may submit to as many sessions as they want, although they may present on only one paper presentation panel and only one other type of session (a roundtable or a creative session).

 

NEMLA_logo

2017 NEMLA CFP: Roundtable on Ableism in the Classroom

With a little less than a month of “official” summer left, I wanted to let everyone know about a roundtable I’ll be running at the 48th NeMLA Annual Convention that will take place in Baltimore from March 23-26, 2017 at the Marriott Baltimore Waterfront.

I am relatively new to Disability Studies and have learned much over the past couple of years, but know there is still much to learn. Please consider submitting an abstract for this session.

 

Ableism in the Classroom: A Roundtable (https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16431)

This roundtable will focus on the ways we address ableism in the literature, language, and writing classrooms. Perspectives are sought on the incorporation and adaptation of course content, class policies, and teaching activities. Both success stories and failure narratives are welcome.

 

Follow the link above to submit a 300-word abstract before the September 30th deadline. Members and non-members of NeMLA may submit to as many sessions as they want, although they may present on only one paper presentation panel and only one other type of session (a roundtable or a creative session).

More NEMLA Calls for Proposals!

With less than a week left until the September 30 deadline, here are four more, awesome panels scheduled for the Northeast Modern Language Association conference in March. These are all focused on popular culture, including comics and the Marvel Cinematic Universe (which I’m partial to myself). Check them out!

The 47th meeting of the Northeast Modern Language Association, March 17th to March 20th in Hartford, Connecticut, will host more than 400 sessions, including ones focused on adaptations of literature for film, and the roles of race and gender in comics.

Below are four calls for papers with links for submitting 300-word abstracts before the September 30th deadline. Members and non-members of NeMLA may submit to as many sessions as they want, although they may present on only one paper presentation panel and only one other type of session (a roundtable or a creative session).

If you have any questions, please email the organizers listed with each session.

“Ruined!” On Failed Adaptations from Page to Screen

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15658

Contact: Emily Lauer (lauere@sunysuffolk.edu), Derek McGrath (derek.s.mcgrath@gmail.com)

This session will explore adaptations that fail in some way. Among our goals, we would like to identify what could be productive about failed adaptations. How do such failures identify what not to do, and can an adaptation that fails to be faithful to its source material still produce a valuable, worthwhile text? We are particularly interested in proposals that look at the adaptation of older artistic and literary forms in online and/or interactive content.

The Marvel Cinematic Universe as Literature

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15845

Contact: Mary Ellen Iatropoulos (maryiatrop@gmail.com), Derek McGrath (derek.s.mcgrath@gmail.com)

With dynamic individual superhuman characters populating a world of complex, interwoven mythologies and origin stories, the films and television series of Marvel Comics Studios experiment with long-form transmedia storytelling. With twelve films and three television series released in less than a decade, all adhering to the same continuity and fictional universe, how can the Marvel Cinematic Universe reveal or offer fresh insight into the ways in which modern cinematic storytelling functions as literature? Approaches may include analysis of one or more films; storytelling across genre and medium; adaptations of the original Marvel Comics to film and television; and applications of various schools of literary and media theory to MCU properties.

The Monster In The House: Domestic Ideology in Superhero Narratives

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15842

Contact: Mary Ellen Iatropoulos (maryiatrop@gmail.com)

In worlds full of superhuman heroes, mythological imaginary creatures and battle narratives of epic scope, what is the role of the domestic? This session seeks proposals investigating the ways in which domestic spaces and domestic ideology function within superhero narratives as sites of union and/or conflict between the human, the subhuman, and the superhuman.

Race and Comics: The Politics of Representation in Sequential Art

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15963

Contact: Rafael Ponce-Cordero (rponcecordero@keene.edu)
This panel welcomes papers that examine the treatment of race and racial relations in comic books, whether in superhero narratives, graphic memoirs, web comics, or other forms of sequential art both inside and outside the United States. How are comics used to document and represent racialized identities? How have the medium and its surrounding fan communities adapted earlier content to speak to current topics?

Calling all writing instructors in the Northeast!

There are just ten days left to submit a proposal to the Northeast Modern Language Association Conference to be held in Hartford, CT in March 2016.

I’m chairing one panel and one roundtable focused on teaching writing and while there are some great submissions already, I’d love to hear from more of the scholar-practitioners doing the innovating in the classroom. Please consider submitting a proposal to one or both of these sessions. And if neither of these grabs your interest, take a look at the other awesome Rhetoric and Composition sessions being offered this year.

The Student as Writer: Embodiment, Mindfulness, and Disability in the Composition Classroom (Panel)

In this session, we review ways to approach the First Year Composition and other writing classrooms by focusing on the students as embodied writers, taking student-centered pedagogy to a new level. Areas of interest for papers include, but are not limited to, mindfulness, yoga, meditation, and disability studies. A combination of theoretical and practical perspectives will be employed to locate the student as embodied writer within the disciplinary tradition.

Evaluating Student Writing (Roundtable)

Have you ever wondered, “How on Earth can I grade this poem? Can creativity even be quantified?” Or, “how should revision fit into the overall course grade?” In this roundtable, writing instructors from a variety of fields (rhetoric and composition; technical writing; creative writing; and more) will discuss their systems for assessing and evaluating student writing in the college classroom. Both conceptual and pragmatic concerns will be addressed for making the evaluation and feedback process an integral part of our writing pedagogy.

CFP for A Second New Edited Collection (Memory in Post-Apocalyptic and Dystopian Tales)

I am thrilled to announce that I have signed another contract with McFarland for a companion collection to Essays on Memory in Popular Culture, this one focusing just on the way memory works in post-apocalyptic and dystopian stories. The tentative title is Recovering What We’ve Lost: Essays on Memory in Post-Apocalyptic and Dystopian Tales. See the below for details and please consider submitting an abstract, or sharing the CFP with anyone you know who might be interested.

Summary

Upcoming collection on memory in post-apocalyptic and dystopian stories, under contract with McFarland and Company, seeks proposals for academic essays on the complex role of rhetorical and social memory in science fiction/fantasy, fandom, and online gaming. Abstracts due 1/5/15 with final essays due 6/1/15.

 

 

Details

For the upcoming collection Recovering What We’ve Lost: Essays on Memory in Post-Apocalyptic and Dystopian Tales, I am seeking abstracts for essays to be included in a collection designed to blend the classical rhetorical concepts of memory with more post-modern approaches to the notion of social and public memory as a lens for examining stories set in post-apocalyptic and/or dystopian settings across many media. Essays analyzing films, television shows, online games, and graphic novels are being requested along with those focusing on traditional print fiction.

 

This collection looks to directly connect two overlapping cultural trends of the early 21st century: the popularity of post-apocalyptic/dystopian speculative fiction and concerns over the ways we remember and memorialize the world around us. Fears regarding the “outsourcing” of memory in the 21st century (to smartphones and other digital devices) are echoes of past panics about loss of memory (such as Plato’s famous complaint about writing). But the current panic is as ahistorical as the previous ones in that much of recorded history relies on memory objects that foster and celebrate shared cultural memories. These might be the ballads of old heroes and monsters or the monuments commemorating great battles or simply a family Bible keeping track of the generations. The power of such memory objects is one reason that post-apocalyptic and dystopian tales resonate so strongly across the generations.

 

As genre and cultural studies scholars have argued before, the post-apocalyptic and dystopian strains of speculative fiction more often than not carry a message of hope. This optimism takes several forms such as recovery of freedom/civilization, resilience of the survivors to carry on, and successful prevention of the dystopia on the part of readers. David Brin has called this tendency the “self-preventing prophecy” and while not all tales in this category fit that mold, many do.

 

A key part of that recovery and resilience is the collective social memory of the characters within the story. At times, the history has been lost and must be reconstructed (see Canticle for Leibowitz) while other stories focus on the characters’ attempts in the immediate aftermath to preserve the cultural memory (as in the show Falling Skies). Much of the power of post-apocalyptic stories lies in the ruins of the familiar: the decaying monuments in Logan’s Run, the traces of familiar English in the dialects of Canticle, the brief mention of the “ancient” form of self-governance known as democracy in Mockingjay. Meanwhile, the power of the state, or other controlling entity, in dystopian tales very often relies on their ability to control information not only about the present, but especially about the past as well.

 

I am particularly interested in receiving abstracts for essays by and about texts from under-represented groups across the spectrum and the globe. In addition, graduate students and junior faculty are especially encouraged to submit abstracts. Anticipated themes of this collection include, but are not limited to,

  • Ancient Memory: Allusions to Shared Myths and Legends
  • Memories of Domestic Life: Hearth and Home
  • Memorials and Landmarks: Visual Symbols of Loss
  • Stolen, not Lost: Authoritarian Control over Information and Memory
  • Entertainments of the Past (Music, Novels, Theater)
  • The immediate past (such as V for Vendetta) compared to long-lost past (such as Hunger Games and Canticle)

While the underlying premise of this collection is rhetorically based, interdisciplinary approaches are most desirable. In particular, my goal is to collect perspectives that cover the intersection of contemporary interpretations and explorations of the ancient rhetorical canon of memory, narrative theory, and cultural studies. Please also keep in mind, however, that the primary audience includes both fans and academics so the approach should be accessible to interested, but not expert, readers.

 

Abstracts (250-500 words) proposing essays of 5-7,000 words each will be accepted until January 5, 2015, with completed essays due June 2015. Please send the abstracts as attached Word files to Heather Urbanski at memoryinsf_book @ icloud.com.

Where to find me at the 2014 Popular Culture/American Culture conference

For those of you attending the Popular Culture/American Culture Association conference (in Chicago from April 16-19), here is where you can find me. Hope to see you there!

 

 Thursday, April 17

Time: 1:45 pm

Science Fiction and Fantasy Area Pizza Party

Location: Lincolnshire 2

 

Time: 5:00 pm

President’s Reception/Awards

Location: 7th Floor Salon 2

 

 

Friday, April 18

Time: 6:30 pm

Session #: 3726: Narrative

Location: Lincolnshire 1

I will be chairing this session and presenting my paper “Narratology of Franchises” along with three other scholars:

  • Christopher Cerimele (Eastern Florida State College): Selling Superficiality: The Disneyfication of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Science Fiction Narratives
  • Laura Osur (Syracuse University): Defiance: An Experiment in Transmedia Storytelling
  • Courtney Neal (DePaul University): Expect the Unexpected: Inverting Character and Narrative in Once Upon a Time

 

 

Saturday, April 19

Time: 8:15 pm

Science Fiction and Fantasy Area Movie Night (Beginning of the End)

Location: Lincolnshire 2

 

 

And you will also find me wandering around the lobby and book room quite often at other times as well. I’ll have copies of the Memory in Popular Culture collection CFP to distribute as well.